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Artist
Hyewon Yun

In modern society, people inevitably experience various emotions. People stand between new emotions and the ones fading out. Artist Hyewon Yun visualizes such complex human emotions by digital graphics. She produces various artworks not only as an image but also through the process of reinterpreting and reassembling language. Currently, Hyewon Yun is a senior majoring in Visual & Media Design at Sookmyung Women's University.
Artist
Hyewon Yun

In modern society, people inevitably experience various emotions. People stand between new emotions and the ones fading out. Artist Hyewon Yun visualizes such complex human emotions by digital graphics. She produces various artworks not only as an image but also through the process of reinterpreting and reassembling language. Currently, Hyewon Yun is a senior majoring in Visual & Media Design at Sookmyung Women's University.
Curatorial Essay
- Emotion and Memory -

Recently, life has rapidly changed due to an invisible virus. While most focus on the difference resulting from the body, Hyewon Yun and Zieho Yoon focus on changes taking place inside humans. As social distancing continues, many people are showing cases of depression. Society has not yet provided a solution to these emotional problems. Artist Hyewon Yun criticizes the social perception of depression in Drown (2019). Depression starts small, but grows. Society does not consider it a major problem and merely asks sufferers to get over it, without giving them time to relieve their emotions.
As viewers scroll down through the works, at some point the images disappear from sight. How do those disappeared images remain in one’s memory? Artist Zieho Yoon expresses the process by which she remembers images in the Wave series and collagraphy Untitled. While in Wave (2017), short lines are overlapped for long memory, the images in Wave (2018) are magnified to see the object from a new perspective. However, no matter how hard we try, memory will always fade, so the artist concludes by expressing the process as a memory blur through Untitled (2018). The works of Hyewon Yun and Zieho Yoon make viewers think once again about the invisible but important emotions and memories that make humans human.

Curator Seohyung Yoon
Individual Work Essay
Drown is a 22-page illustration that visualizes the idea of depression in reality by a combination of text and images. Artist Hyewon Yun expresses how negative emotions deepen inside a person by depicting a fish swimming into a deep sea. Here, to negate linguistic interpretation, the artist disassembles letters and turns them into images. By this method, she highlights the feeling of depression.
Depression does not begin from a grand incident, rather it gradually stacks up inside. When a small sigh reaches the surface of the water, small ripples occur and get larger as time goes by. This is the same with depression, as it gradually seeps into a person. When small feelings pile up, it is hard to get out of it. Here, negative expressions such as "the sea calls me, runs away, lives, dies" accumulate inside, later creating a gloomy ego of a fish. Now the fish gives up and no longer tries to get out of depression, but rests helplessly. It no longer struggles, so it sinks deeper and deeper into the dark gloomy sea.
Sometimes people reach out to help those who are depressed. The artist depicts this by an image of a fish being drawn out of the water. As the fish denies reality and gradually swims deeper into the sea, cheerful words in the shape of a fishing hook are sent down to help it out. The fish is deceived by such words and emerges from its hiding place. However, the only thing that is waiting for it is a unified standard demanded by the society. Without the chance to fully shake off its depression the fish is processed and sold in cans according to the standards of modern society. Still, society prevents the fish from sinking back into gloom with deceptive phrases such as "You're the best, cheer up." These words written above the bar code are so small that it is hard to recognize whether the text is even there. Society sends out hopeful words to the fish, but they are actually words that are passed on without any empathy.
Yun depicts how depressed emotions are dealt with in society. People often label people as “depressed” without asking why they are depressed and even worse, without distinguishing whether the feelings are even depression. Others regard their feelings as trivial, and try to cheer them up without proper empathy. Furthermore, people suffering from depression are transformed into positive people suitable for society without the time to fully relieve their negative emotions.

Curator Seohyung Yoon