www.clickscrollzoom.com
Artist
Taejun Yun

Born in 1987, he is working in Seoul and Gwangju. He is interested in various technologies that produce visual images. To convert a sense recognized by a body organ into a visual image through a specific object with a physical object. At the same time, the photographic media uses the property of cloning objects to present objects and senses as visual representations. It combines the mirage of photographs that represent reality with the clarity of the real world and produces them in its work.


Heejoon Lee

Born in 1988, he is working in Seoul. He pays attention to the aesthetics of design pervading in various locations within the scenery surrounding our lives. He cautiously examines the proportions, balance, and colors of his surrounding environments and seeks subjects for his paintings. Through the process of expanding and editing his collection of sceneries, Lee creates abstract images composed of vertical and horizontal color-planes. He symbolizes the outer scenery and transfers it onto the canvas. In the process of reproducing the images with painting methods, he creates multiple layers and extracts new textures through his brushstrokes, to visualize the layers of time and space he has discovered while observing cityscapes.

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(01-1)
Taejun Yun
Low,quickdraw _no.03
2019, photography, dimension variable
(01-2)
heejoon Lee
Gaudi Cafe
2020, Acrylic and Photo-Collage on Canvas, 73 x 73 cm
(01-3)
heejoon Lee
The Bangkok Sunset
2020, Acrylic and Photo-Collage on Canvas, 91 x 91 cm
(02-4)
Taejun Yun
Low,quickdraw _no.03
2019, photography, dimension variable
(02-5)
heejoon Lee
Sun, Moon and One Star
2020, Acrylic and Photo-Collage on Canvas, 45.5 x 45.5 cm
(02-6)
Taejun Yun
Low, quickdraw_no. 27
2019, photography, dimension variable
(03-7)
heejoon Lee
A Dry Land
2020, Acrylic and Photo-Collage on Canvas, 73 x 73 cm
(03-8)
Taejun Yun
Low, quickdraw_no. 20
2019, photography, dimension variable
(03-9)
Taejun Yun
Low, quickdraw_no. 02
2019, photography, dimension variable
(04-10)
Taejun Yun
Low, quickdraw_no. 19
2019, photography, dimension variable
(04-11)
heejoon Lee
Sineu Market
2020, Acrylic and Photo-Collage on Canvas, 53 x 53 cm

(05-12)
Taejun Yun
Low, quickdraw_no. 14
2019, photography, dimension variable
(05-13)
heejoon Lee
Yongwol
Acrylic and Photo-Collage on Canvas, 45.5 x 45.5 cm

(06-14)
heejoon Lee
Camellias
2020, Acrylic and Photo-Collage on Canvas, 45.5 x 45.5 cm
(06-15)
Taejun Yun
Low, quickdraw_no. 10
2019, photography, dimension variable

(07-16)
heejoon Lee
A Hand Found in Barcelona
2020, Acrylic and Photo-Collage on Canvas, 53 x 53 cm
(07-17)
heejoon Lee
Dreamcatchers
2020, Acrylic and Photo-Collage on Canvas, 91 x 91 cm
(07-18)
Taejun Yun
Low, quickdraw_no. 17
2019, photography, dimension variable
Artist
Taejun Yun

Born in 1987, he is working in Seoul and Gwangju. He is interested in various technologies that produce visual images. To convert a sense recognized by a body organ into a visual image through a specific object with a physical object. At the same time, the photographic media uses the property of cloning objects to present objects and senses as visual representations. It combines the mirage of photographs that represent reality with the clarity of the real world and produces them in its work.


Heejoon Lee

Born in 1988, he is working in Seoul. He pays attention to the aesthetics of design pervading in various locations within the scenery surrounding our lives. He cautiously examines the proportions, balance, and colors of his surrounding environments and seeks subjects for his paintings. Through the process of expanding and editing his collection of sceneries, Lee creates abstract images composed of vertical and horizontal color-planes. He symbolizes the outer scenery and transfers it onto the canvas. In the process of reproducing the images with painting methods, he creates multiple layers and extracts new textures through his brushstrokes, to visualize the layers of time and space he has discovered while observing cityscapes.
Curatorial Essay
-The Crossing Point (Taejun Yun, heejoon Lee) -


 Today's art exhibition area, unlike other popular creative fields naturally absorbed in the online environment, does not easily reflect the character and perspective of modern people. Although the online environment is highly likely to be an exhibition environment that can be effectively delivered to the public, research on it is still narrow. In other words, the content of the exhibition and the general public's eye level that can perceive and think about it are still vertical.

The clickscrollzoom.com exhibition of “Crossing Point," which paid attention to the visitor's body, originated from the preceding problem. Exhibitions that take into account the "body" and "spirit" of visitors who accept the contents of the exhibition must be made online as well. The series of views on "exhibition plan-view points-explain" includes feelings that visitors are in real exhibition space, as well as a flexible will to pay more attention to the exhibition. At first glance, "Viewpoint," which shows the works displayed in the space in three dimensions, may seem to limit the perspective of visitors, but it is not the case at all. Rather, it can be understood in the form of presenting elements of the work that visitors may miss at eye level. This form of implementation is designed from the idea that showing the works of two artists simultaneously through the properties of contrast and intersection creates a more effective understanding than displaying them individually.


Lee Hee-jun's work and Yoon Tae-joon's works embody the possibility of discourse on materiality, and encourage us to grasp real facts. Virtuality and realism, traditionally accepted as different characteristics of painting and photography media, are in line with the possibility of reading their works and the practice (act) their images hold. In addition, the entity that internalizes the two tasks faces our bodies through capacity and openness as a medium for mediating phenomena and reality in itself. The perceptual-awareness, physical-mental activities that each pursued in different areas illuminate and encourage each other, starting with the physicality in which images reveal their stories. How does our perception allow us to experience their work beyond the status quo? Also, how does our imagination lead to two separate works for successive reasons? In the "Crossing Point" exhibition, which includes such questions, the two works are already a strong mix, and are being renewed.

Curator Kibeom Nam, Hyesun Ryu, Hyelim Chun
Individual Work Essay
Low, Quickdraw (2019), Taejun Yun

The inventory of photography started in 1839 and since then just about everything has been photographed, or so it seems. So we have believed that we can observe and understand the world or the object more carefully via what the camera captures. But understanding begins when you don't see something as it appears. Because something else is combined into the object beyond what it appears to be. Taejun Yun accentuates the material nature of things, leading us to recognize something beyond them.
The Low, Quickdraw (2019) series removes the detailed information of a three-dimensional subject and places it on the plane of the photograph. The materials in the work have no other information than the detailed form and texture which are revealed. We do not know when or where it was taken or if it lies in a space that is seen as virtual reality. Taejun Yun manipulates these untrue elements, removing. Even its history and placing the thing between reality and fiction. Thus, objects exist in thin layers (photographs) that cannot explain themselves.
Everything that comes between us and things is removed and the empty space is filled with the solid property of matter itself. Materiality does not only refer to specific senses. It is a sum of diversity given to a sense such as weight, touch, volume, and shape. Thus, Taejun Yun does not allow viewers to stay on the surface of photographs that are familiar to them, and to reduce the property of matter with visuals. He pushes things into our physical parts. The stories and sensations of the object that disappeared from his photography are correlated and re-connected within our minds.
Thanks to this, photography breaks away from its traditional role of reproducing reality. Yun’s photos do not reproduce the concrete reality that exists in front of his eyes. Instead, he reproduces a thing's unique property visually compressed and opens the door to the possibility of reasoning, contemplation and illusion about it. In the end, it extends the range of our perception-recognition of objects or phenomena through photography and brings us closer to reality.

Curator Kibeom Nam, Hyesun Ryu, Hyelim Chun
The Tourist (2020) series

The individual works of The Tourist (2020) series by Lee Hee-joon approach us sequentially from some point on the border between the whole and the parts. He prints low-quality photographs taken during his trips on A4 paper, applies them on canvas, and places them on top of the geometric forms of acrylic painting reconstructed in his own language. The viewer is attracted to the opaque yet bold geometric shapes of the strong nature, but soon becomes aware of the objects in the picture, which are giving up their seats, vaguely backing away as if to embrace the figure. The series of gaze-recognition processes that the viewers undergo as they meet the work is repeated several times in line with the will of the audience to guess the scene captured by the artist on the trip. Their will and gaze-recognition's footprints go back and forth between parts and the whole. In addition, in the painting, the emotions felt by the artist while looking at the landscape and the experience of the viewer looking at the geometric shapes and phenomena are combined to complete the non-visual and abstract three-dimensional character.

Lee Hee-joon completed his work without any negation of the flatness of the painting in the square frame. Let us suppose that his works are made up of several layers. The layer of acrylic paint, which has a presence and a heavy drop at the top, is the result of condensation of scenes in the artist's memory and their images into material shapes. The layer seems to preoccupy the entire screen in a fairly unrivaled manner and even makes one think that it is intentionally blocking what the audience wants to see. In the process, we catch the fundamental question that Lee Hee-joon asks: what is the top layer blocking us from? Why did we try to infer the obscured part of a low-quality photograph that contained only very fragmentary information?

The "reality" Lee tries to implement on canvas by going back and forth between paintings and photographs is eventually contained in a layer merged into one, not a combination of partially identified information. The thickness of the fragment photograph is very thin. This thin layer does not work independently. We listen carefully to the voice of the thick colored material. We greet it with a feeling of five senses opening. Until the reality of the artist's experience has reached the viewer, layers of different attributes open one by one. This calls to mind Heidegger's existential concept that existence is not defined by regulations, but that one leaves one’s own possibilities open; then the true value of Lee Hee-joon's painting is discovered. The property he built on the canvas is also a link that connects our senses and spirit, suggesting the scalability of experience and a new formative communication method. Through the new order of "Reality-Photo-Abstract painting" he suggests, he conveys to the audience the reality he has experienced, while at the same time evoking the scope of the artist and viewer's communication and perception.

Curator Kibeom Nam, Hyesun Ryu, Hyelim Chun